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Thread: Topsy's Spitfire Library

  1. #1

    Default Topsy's Spitfire Library

    Over the years I have built up quite a library of books about the Spitfire and one or two of it's opponents. Quite a few are in French, which goes to show the interest for this aircraft outside english speaking circles. I sometimes have two editions of the same book so as not to miss out on some editorial corrections & additions.

    For me that absolute bible is Morgan & Shacklady's "SPITFIRE The History". It's a bit like a telephone directory with details of every Spitfire & Seafire built, even though when checking with other sources there are some errors and omissions. It remains nevertheless the major reference book about this iconic aircraft.

    One of my more recent acquisitions is "They Gave me a Seafire" by Cdr Mike Crosley, which gives some interesting details about the differences in landing techniques used by FAA compared to the RAF.
    Quote
    ... by placing the pilot behind it (Merlin engine) in a low 'anti-g' sitting posture, the view over the nose was restricted to four degrees below the flight line. On the airfield or flight deck, the view forward therefore consisted of treetops or ships' masts. The RAF pilots resolved this difficulty by approaching to land in a semi-glide, at speeds well above the stall. They retained their forward view in the early part of landing by doing 'wheeler' landings. This not only allowed them a good forward view and good directional control after landing, but placed the loads vertically up the undercarriage legs, where Mitchell intended them to be. In the case of a three-point, stalled, landings, there was a bending moment, tending to wrench the attachment point free from the main spar. Naval deck landings were, perforce, always made in the three point touchdown posture, at which attitude it was at stalling incidence, about 15 degrees.
    Unquote
    I find this a bit surprising as we in EAF have always practiced three-point landings in all the sims we fly in. As a result when I tried the 'wheeler' landing in DCS the other day I got into all sorts of trouble as with a higher touchdown speed, you have to be very straight because of the narrow u/c and to come off the power gently as torque is still a big factor.

    I am sure you will find plenty of other interesting books & documents in the attached file list. Happy reading
    Topsy's Library : SH Library.pdf
    "Sit and spin the fire". Extract from Topsy Turvey Land, a poem by William Brighty Rands.
    "In the bar everyone knows what they should have done - the problem is in applying it in the heat of the action". F Barthe RIP

  2. #2

    Default Re: Topsy's Spitfire Library

    Nice list Topsy!

    I just bought A spifire pilots story but haven´t had time to read it yet. It looks promising.

    I got interested in Lonely Warrior Jean OFFENBERG by Victor HOUART. Can you recommend it?

    S!



    ----------------------------------------------
    Now, m'boy! You must foight or be killed or be ruined entoirely!

    Mram´s WWII Aviation bookpage

  3. #3

    Default Re: Topsy's Spitfire Library

    A real complete library. And the case wants to be 109 as the initials of the enemy n.1, the books contained. My modest tribute to those who love this extraordinary aircraft.


    Max De Meo

  4. #4

    Default Re: Topsy's Spitfire Library

    Quote Originally Posted by Mram_EAF331 View Post
    Nice list Topsy!

    I just bought A spifire pilots story but haven´t had time to read it yet. It looks promising.

    I got interested in Lonely Warrior Jean OFFENBERG by Victor HOUART. Can you recommend it?

    S!
    @Mram
    A long time since I read it, but it recounts the life of a Belgian fighter pilot who defended Belgium and then fled to England to join the RAF. He took part in the Battle of Britain and was killed in Jan 1942. The book is written up from his pilot notes and diaries. The book is in my country home and I'll be there next for the Christmas holidays. If you can wait I'll have a quick look through again and give you a more qualified opinion.
    "Sit and spin the fire". Extract from Topsy Turvey Land, a poem by William Brighty Rands.
    "In the bar everyone knows what they should have done - the problem is in applying it in the heat of the action". F Barthe RIP

  5. #5

    Default Re: Topsy's Spitfire Library

    It is enough info Topsy.

    It´s now on my wishlist.



    ----------------------------------------------
    Now, m'boy! You must foight or be killed or be ruined entoirely!

    Mram´s WWII Aviation bookpage

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